Acraspis erinacei (agamic)

Family: Cynipidae | Genus: Acraspis
Detachable: detachable
Color: red, yellow, green, black, purple
Texture: hairy, hairless, spiky/thorny
Abdundance: abundant
Shape: globular
Season: Fall, Summer
Alignment: erect
Walls: thick
Location: upper leaf, lower leaf, leaf midrib
Form:
Cells: polythalamous
Possible Range:i
Common Name(s): Hedgehog Gall Wasp
Synonymy:
Name
Notes
Acraspis erinaceae
Cynips quercus erinaceus
Dryophanta erinacei
Acraspis quercus-erinacei
Andricus fulvicollis form erinacei
Reversed; invalid synonymy
Biorhiza fulvicollis
Reversed; invalid synonymy
Biorrhiza fulvicollis
Reversed; invalid synonymy
Cynips fulvicollis
Reversed; invalid synonymy
Cynips quercus erinacei
Philonix erinacei
Philonix fulvicollis
Reversed; invalid synonymy
Philonyx erinacei
Quercus erinaceus
Teras fulvicollis
Reversed; invalid synonymy
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  • image of Acraspis erinacei (agamic)

Life histories of American Cynipidae

Andricus fulvicollis form erinacei [Kinsey reverses the synonymy of fulvicollis and erinacei in later work]

Philonix fulvicollis
Cynips quercus erinacei
Teras fulvicollis
Cynips fulvicollis
Acraspis erinacei
Biorhiza fulvicollis
Biorrhiza fulvicollis
Acraspis quercus-erinacei

Galls. — Oval leaf-galls (Fig. 34), densely covered with fine spines, reddish purple. The galls are globular or more often oval, 10X14 mm., more or less, the surface light yellowish, closely set with small, raised points, each tipped with a slender, thread like, flexuous spine 2 or 3 mm. long, yellowish, reddish purple, or blackish in color. Within, the tissue is compact-granular, the larval cells usually two or three (two to eight), each measuring about 1. 5X2.0 mm., the cells distinct but inseparable. Attached by a single point to a main-vein, on the upper or under surfaces of leaves of Quercus alba.

Range: Ontario, MA, CT, NY, NJ, PA, VA, NC, FL, OH, IN, IL, MI, IO, KS, OK, CO [Kinsey places question marks by FL and CO indicating some doubt about these records]

Beutenmuller is authority for the identity of erinacei and fulvicollis. This gall appears in late June, becoming mature about the last of August, staying on the trees into October. The insects emerge from November 5 to 21. or even in early December, often when the weather is very cold, and snow is on the ground. The insect oviposits in the young buds of the oak trees. Fuller details of the habits of this species are given in Triggerson’s paper.

- Alfred Charles Kinsey: (1920) Life histories of American Cynipidae©

Reference: https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/213997#page/39/mode/1up


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